SEEING WITH BETTER EYES

Posted by in Blog | 1 comment

SEEING WITH BETTER EYES

We’re in a time (not just August) where it’s very difficult to see beyond “what’s happening to me?” When we are in a stressful situation, one of the first things to go is politeness, which translates to awareness of others. If we’re in extreme pain or stress or fear, it doesn’t matter if someone else is. When we get stressed to our limits, it’s a rare person who can see above and beyond that to then care about others.

That’s not us being mean or hard. It’s human nature to protect self first when in danger. Obviously, the exception to this is a mother protecting her children, but even then, everyone else becomes unimportant. While many don’t see this time as dangerous – having food, home, job, money, even if it’s not a lot, tells us logically we’re not in danger (this doesn’t including the danger we’re currently facing with escalating possibilities from some ego-crazed world leaders). But the energy we’re facing now is reminiscent of moments in our past lives when complete physical destruction was on us (which makes us more sensitive to the ego-crazed world leaders and their chest thumping at the expense of everyone else).

What we’re experiencing isn’t just normal, everyday stress. In this transition time, moving from Piscean Age to Aquarian Age, we innately know that we’re reaching for a higher vibration which brings in higher awareness that puts us in harmony with the planet. It’s where we’re going in the bigger plan of human evolution. If we don’t achieve that, we don’t belong here.

The profundity of this stress was last felt when there was a physical disaster like war, famine, or cataclysm in our past lives. But because the vibe is so similar, we can’t tell this is an inner-soul challenge, not a physical one. So our reactions in self-preservation relate to an inner recognition of threat-to-self on a much bigger scale. That makes the primary concern “what’s happening to me?” a really big deal.

In this transition, the focus is on us to learn things about ourselves that stretch all the boundaries we already know. The stress is high, over and above what we put ourselves through in the expectations of everyday life, i.e., fear of loss of income, fear of not getting a job, or fear of a difficult boss, a long drive to and from work through rush hour traffic, family and friends who want something “more”, not having a satisfying relationship. The list of stresses that we accept as normal is almost endless. Then add the stress of what we decided we’d heal or learn in this life before we reincarnated and the “get it or we don’t belong here” energy of the Age to Age transition and it’s a pretty daunting experience.

Human nature not only “circles the wagons” at times like these, it also highlights how we judge (or rather, misjudge) others based on how we feel we would react to their situation, even when the person reacting is completely logical within their own personality. They can’t see why we are judging them because they are also judging us in how we should solve a problem based on how they would do it.

This is one of the strongest lessons that’s put in front of us right now – being able to acknowledge what we’re going through and acknowledge that others are having a hard time, too, without judging that they’re wrong and we’re right in how we handle it. This brings us to being able to see with better eyes, with Aquarian Age eyes, to getting the whole picture, not just our little bubble of it in the moment.

Everyone has their own journey and, while times bring us together in commonality, we are still very different with our own set of enlightenments to accomplish. No one is better than another on their own personal journey. But right now as we shift, it’s easy to see with judgment instead of understanding.

Case in point:

Years ago, I knew a woman who genuinely had DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder or what used to be called Multiple Personality Disorder). She had experienced years of childhood abuse from her father and uncle and was a permanent Ward of the State. With all that, she was able to sometimes function in normal society. She was the girlfriend of a friend of my then significant other. The friend had known and loved this woman for years even though she was very damaged.

Before I met her, others in our group had spent time with her and talked about how weird she was, how removed and strange. She was just “off”. She was different enough that they considered her an outsider and could never see her functioning as part of the group. They didn’t go so far as to make fun of her, but the implications were close.

Then I met her. It was only once for thirty minutes. I expected “weird” based on previous information but I found she was quiet, reserved, careful, a little off-normal and seemed very tightly-wound as if holding a lot within. I could tell she was expecting judgment, ready to fly away at a moment’s notice. But she faced what scared her, which basically was other people.

I didn’t find her strange or weird or removed. What I saw and felt was an incredibly brave individual who had no idea what “normal” was and yet was pulling it off very well. Through her abuse, even after years of therapy, she didn’t have the innate background we all have of how to behave with others or in society because her “normal” wasn’t even close. She was faking it and never knew if she was right but carried on in the face of her fear every moment of every day. Her inner strength and survival instinct was astounding. I was incredibly impressed.

The people in my group who were judging her based on how they thought she should act were missing the point. They were comparing her behavior to how they thought they would act in the same situation without having a real clue what that would be. It was small-minded of them and made me see them differently, made me recognize them with limitations I hadn’t noticed before. They were “circling their wagons” to protect themselves from something they didn’t understand and fed each others’ reactions.

I see this all the time in readings: people either can’t understand why someone significant to them acts the way they do, or they very specifically compare the other person’s actions to how they themselves would react in a given situation, as if they weren’t two separate individuals with their own backgrounds and reasoning.

Perhaps I can see where someone is coming from without a lot of judgment because I have been misunderstood most of my life. I always saw things from a different perspective, especially as a child. It made me unusual, over-sensitive, over-dramatic, weird, just outside of “normal”. That was long before I knew who and what I was as a human being with certain skills.

Instead of developing that difference openly, I succumbed and adapted to the “normal” and kept my “weird” private. I learned to put a facade over who I was to fit in and prosper. But there was always a part of me that no one knew until, as an adult, I found others who were like me, others who had two distinctly different faces that got them through life safely.

Because of being misunderstood, I developed a sensitivity to seeing from the other person’s point of view and even before I developed my psychic skills, intuitively saw clearly what was misunderstood in others.

Everyone has a reason that is completely justified in what they do, how they act and react. Many times, they don’t even know the “why” of their behavior because we were never taught when we were children to look within and know self first. At least most of us weren’t. Many times, the reactions are because of influences from past lives or childhood issues that aren’t even consciously remembered.

But the point is that every action, reaction, feeling and opinion is justified whether or not we understand that in another. All of our actions, reactions, feelings and opinions are justified within us, why can’t they be accepted within another? Even if we don’t agree with them.

We will never know everything another went through to get them to “this moment”, as they will never know what is deep inside us. If we keep that in consideration when dealing with others during this transition, especially during the difficulties August represents, we pave a much easier path for ourselves and those around us. That ease resonates into the world and can help de-escalate some of the craziness going on. That’s a big order, but it’s worth a shot. Every little bit helps.

We all affect each other, whether or not we’re doing it consciously or purposefully. If we can take that step to look outside of “what’s happening to me?” and see with better eyes, we help understand ourselves better, avoid unneeded stress, and grow into the vibe that is in harmony with the planet and all life. Give it a try. It’s not easy, but it’s so worth it.

I offer this with love and gratitude…

1 Comment

  1. Thank you so much for this “eye opening” article Laurie. For a while now, I have seen much more push-pull energy. I’ve observed it with fearful leaders – as you mentioned, in public, such as what happened in Charlottesville, and other places. For the most part, I’ve been silent to it all. But, after reading your posting and the ones you wrote leading up to this one, I had an “Aha” moment. I realized since I internalize stuff, this push/pull energy was inside of me too. It hadn’t occurred to me that I had absorbed a lot of this extra stress. So now, with better eyes, I will not only look at others with more understanding, but at myself as well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get my updates via email!